Hoping for Federalism: An Ethnic Perspective

Last week in Thanphyuyat, I was stopped at the toll gate. The soldier there confiscated and checked my phone. I’m used to soldiers checking things: It reminded me of when they checked my ID in Rakhine State. But there’s a feeling of numb panic when someone checks your phone during a military coup.

As an ethnic minority in Myanmar, I have a different lens on the story than most. You see, for many ethnic groups, we distrust both the military and the National League for Democracy…

Coup

VOICES FROM A COUP series:
I write this in urgency, unsure of whether I will be stripped of my freedom and my life.  But if I were to vanish, I hope this piece will help other parts of the world.

Coup Government’s Coercive Mechanisms Meet the Voices of Protesters

VOICES FROM A COUP series: General Min Aung Hlaing, head of the government installed by the coup, said conducting a coup was “inevitable” (Sai Wanna, 2021). The coup was conducted to take power from the re-elected government of Daw Aung San Su Kyi’s National League of Democracy Party due to the state of emergency (Myanmar Now, 2021a) under the Section 417 of the 2008 Constitution, which focuses on the loss of national solidarity, sovereignty and the rise of insurgency, violence and other impacts.